IWHC works in two very different but critically linked worlds — international policy and local capacity — to change thinking, redirect funding, and motivate action by people and institutions that can secure rights and health for women.

We have worked in alliance with advocates and policymakers to influence the outcome of many major UN deliberations, including the International Conference on Population and Development (ICPD), Commission on the Status of Women (CSW), Commission on Population and Development (CPD), Fourth World Conference on Women, and intergovernmental negotiations related to the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) and the Post-2015 Development Agenda.

Learn more about IWHC’s history at the UN.


Nikki Haley: Trump’s Choice for US Ambassador to the UN is a Poor Choice for a Bold Women’s Agenda

South Carolina Governor Haley is an unfortunate choice to represent the United States at the single-most important multilateral institution prepared to tackle the world’s global challenges.

Can Rex Tillerson Lead on Women’s Rights?

Trump’s nominee for Secretary of State, Rex Tillerson, brings no foreign policy, public sector, or diplomatic experience to the position of the country’s chief foreign policy advisor and top diplomat.

US Congress: A Major Threat to the UN

New proposed legislation is part of a growing attack against the UN, and against the very principles of multilateralism.

Bringing Girls into the Data Revolution

How local groups around the world are filling the information gap and making sure girls' voices are heard.

We Need a Feminist Secretary-General at the United Nations

We now know the next Secretary General won’t be a woman, but will he be a feminist?

Rio Statement of Reproductive Health and Justice

  • October 7, 2016

The Rio Conference—“Reproductive Health and Justice: International Women’s Health Conference for Cairo ’94”—took place from January 24 to 28, 1994, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. In five days, the 215 women from 79 countries who gathered in Rio generated this 21-point statement and strategies and activities to ensure that women’s perspectives and experiences are considered…

A Joint Civil Society Analysis of the 2016 Political Declaration: On the Fast-Track to Accelerate the Fight against HIV and to End the AIDS Epidemic by 2030

  • September 1, 2016

The 2016 United Nations Political Declaration on HIV and AIDS should have been a critical milestone.  It was the opportunity for governments to elaborate how they intended to meet the ambitious target of ending the AIDS epidemic by 2030 that they committed to as part of the Sustainable Development Goals just last year. In order…

What’s Data Got to Do With It?

Data can help us measure progress towards fulfilling the promise of the 2030 Agenda, but it can’t—and shouldn’t—drive the agenda itself.

Nothing About Us Without Us: Governments Must Engage Youth in HIV/AIDS Response

Governments must act immediately to halt the spread of HIV among its young populations, and young people themselves must be at the center of these efforts. But young people thus far have been noticeably absent from the decision-making process, and not for lack of trying.

As Europe Grapples with Refugee Crisis, Women’s Human Rights Cannot Be Neglected

As the continent struggles to address the unprecedented Syrian refugee crisis, it must ensure that women's human rights are at the core of its efforts.