Founded in 1989 by experts in public health and women´s rights, Grupo Curumim works at the local, state, and national levels to advance women’s health and rights at all stages of their lives.

In 2002, the organization created Cunhatã, a program that provides leadership training for in- and out-of-school youth that delivers vital information on sexuality, reproductive health, gender, communications, decision-making, and human rights that empowers young people to make healthy decisions in their own lives and encourages them to participate in local activism in their communities. Grupo Curumim also trains teachers and health care professionals on adolescent sexual and reproductive health and rights, with a focus on helping young people develop critical thinking skills and protect themselves from sexually transmitted infections and unintended pregnancy.

Mission

Grupo Curumim aims to strengthen women´s citizenship in all phases of their lives by promoting human rights, health, gender equality, and reproductive rights, through the perspective of social justice and democracy.

Impact

Brazil has undergone massive change over the past few decades: economic growth has fueled rapid industrialization and urbanization in some areas. But the government is failing to meet its young population's education and health care needs. A lack of sexuality education has resulted in a high adolescent birth rate (71.4 births per 1,000 women), and the number of HIV infections in Brazil has increased by 11 percent among adolescents and youths (ages 15-24), representing a third of new infections.

IWHC has supported Grupo Curumim since 1994, with a focus on the organization's work to educate young people of their human rights, including their sexual and reproductive health and rights, and empower them with leadership and decision-making skills. With IWHC's support, Grupo Curumim has expanded its adolescent program to train government health care workers and educators to provide accurate, nonjudgmental, and honest information to young people so they are better equipped to make a safe, healthy transition to adulthood.

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